All about FaceBook Marketing with retargeting

Advertisers can be savvy about using retargeting ads to generate repeat sales by advertising products similar to those that a customer has already purchased. Retargeting serves as a great way to cost-effectively use reminder advertising. Typically, previous customers are more likely to buy from you than someone who has never heard of you, so creating audiences of previous customers is a great way to generate ongoing sales.
What stands true, though, is that after a week of retargeting, you may want to stop focusing on immediate purchases and aim for longer-term relationships with your website’s visitors. That is, you should try to keep in touch with your potential customers until they’re ready to convert instead of trying to convince them to convert and then giving up when they don’t.
I did want to mention a recent test that I did where in addition to the call to action below, I placed a link in the text area above the image.  The result out of 5000 clicks? Only 5% of the clicks came from the link up top.  95% of the clicks came from the call to action below.  I believe that people are becoming conditioned to engage that section of an ad. How To Quickly Create Social Media Content

Timing can also be seasonal. Retailers that do most of their business during the Q4 gifting season can create a custom audience targeting those who don’t buy from them year-round. Susan uses the example of women visiting a men’s retailer site based on clicks from a holiday gift guide. Knowing that traffic from this particular piece of content is likely driven by people who aren’t shopping for themselves, you can retarget this audience during other gift-giving times of the year such as Father’s Day.
At DigitalMarketer, we opted to create a closed group, so our customers would be able to locate our groups easier. This does result in an influx of requests to join from unqualified members, but the tradeoff is worth it—we let the world know that we have a tribe of thousands of digital marketing enthusiasts, and use the “publicity” of an exclusive group to build FOMO (“fear of missing out”).
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